Half Hour Call: Coil + Drift's Podcast Debut

Coil + Drift is delighted to make our podcast debut today on Half Hour Call with Chris King.

Designer and Owner, John Sorensen-Jolink discusses being a young and judgmental 17-yr-old dancer in NYC, the college mentor who told him he mattered (#GusSolomonsJr), and his propensity to refer to Coil + Drift as 'we' long before he hired his first employee. 

Listen to Half Hour Call now on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts.

We're Hiring: seeking Metal Fabricator

Summary of Position:
The person hired for this position should expect to be involved in metal fabrication for Coil + Drift, a fast-growing furniture design studio based in New York City. You will be working directly with designer / owner John Sorensen-Jolink and a small team who's hard work and unique design perspective recently earned Coil + Drift the 2016 International Furniture Fair Editors' Award for Best First-Time Exhibitor.

Required Skills:
•   Proficient in TIG welding
•   Experience grinding, filing, sanding and finishing
•   Experience welding brass
•   Experience with wood-working
•   The ability to communicate effectively
•   Attention to detail
•   The ability to work independently

Responsibilities:
•   Production metal fabrication
•   Custom metal fabrication
•   Maintenance of metal working tools and equipment
•   Basic wood-working fabrication

This is a part-time paid position requiring 1-3 days per week in our Ridgewood, Queens studio. Coil + Drift loves diversity and encourages applicants of all races, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, and cultural backgrounds to apply. Refugees especially welcome. Please send a cover letter, resumé, and metal working portfolio to info@coilanddrift.com. Visit www.coilanddrift.com to learn more about us.

Inspired: Spike Jonze for Kenzo Parfums

We're always looking out for extraordinary ways that design and dance come together.  This commercial for Kenzo Parfums insantly caught our eye with it's extraordinary dance (Margaret Qualley) and choreography (Ryan Heffington, who also choreographed Sia's dance-music videos) as well as beautiful design aesthetic (KK Barrett, Spike Jonze).  

Check it out and let us know what you think.

Written & Directed by: Spike Jonze
Actress: Margaret Qualley
Executive Producer: Humberto Leon & Carol Lim
Costumes: Heidi Bivens
Song: Mutant Brain (feat. Assassin) by Sam Spiegel & Ape Drums
Production Design: KK Barrett
Director of Photography: Hoyte van Hoytema
Choreographer: Ryan Heffington

Of Form & Function: Video of Coil + Drift Founder John Sorensen-Jolink

This June NBC News, along with Mercedes-Benz, made a video profile of Coil + Drift founder John Sorensen-Jolink.  The pieces is part of the #TogetherWeDream series, in which they created four profiles of gay and lesbian creators, following them though their lives and documenting their unique creative processes.

The outcome is a stunning view of Sorensen-Jolink's life at the axis of design and dance, and we are excited to share it with the world.  Thanks to NBC News, Mercedes-Benz, and Blue Chalk Media for creating this beautiful video.

Coil + Drift Receives 2016 ICFF Editors' Award for Best New Designer

Coil + Drift Receives Prestigious ICFF Editors’ Award

New York, N.Y. (May 18, 2016) ­­– Emerging design studio, Coil + Drift, has received the highly coveted and industry prestigious ICFF® Editors’ Award for Best First Time Exhibitor.  The award recognizes the young studio, helmed by dancer-turned-designer John Sorensen-Jolink, as the best and most innovative new exhibitor at ICFF 2016.  Past winners of the award include Rich Brilliant Willing (2011), Egg Collective (2012), Souda (2014), and Pepe Heykoop (2015).

The 2016 ICFF Editors’ Award winners were announced and presented by the Editor Judging Committee:

About Coil + Drift

Based in Brooklyn, NY, Coil + Drift is the design studio of John Sorensen-Jolink, an acclaimed modern-dancer-turned-designer who performed with contemporary choreographers and directors such as Robert Wilson, Lucinda Childs, and Twyla Tharp before beginning his self-taught design practice three years ago.  The studio creates luxurious American-made contemporary furniture, lighting, and accessories that emphasize creative form, sustainability and effortless functionality.  Their collection is designed using the unique spacial awareness of a dancer and choreographer to create hand-crafted items that give energy to a space in a new and refreshing way.

About ICFF®

ICFF® is the premier North American global Design showcase for interior furniture, seating, carpet and flooring, lighting, outdoor furniture, materials, wall coverings, accessories, textiles, kitchen and bath and fabricators, attracting more than 700 exhibitors and 33,000 attendees from around the world. The 28th annual ICFF happened May 14-17, 2016, at New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. Visit www.icff.com for more information.

 

Coil + Drift named an Honoree for Emerging Talent, NYCxDesign Awards

Wow, thanks to Interior Design Magazine, the International Contemporary Furniture Fairand all the judges for making Coil + Drift, and specifically our Dusk series, an honoree in the Emerging Talent category for a 2016 NYCxDesign Award. We are honored!  

Winners will be announced May 14 at the ICFF Opening Night Party at MoMa.  Come see our new work at ICFF May 14 - 17, Booth 2362.

See all the honorees on InteriorDesignMag.com.

#NYCxDESIGNawards #NYCxDESIGN #icff2016 #coilanddrift2016

House Tour: Designer John Sorensen-Jolink's Brooklyn Home

A few months back photographer Elaine Musiwa reached out to me and asked if she could photograph my (at the time) new home in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.  She came over and shot the space and we had a great time talking furniture and home design together.  Today Houzz published a beautifully-written and photographed house tour of my home.  Here are images from the tour, including a few that didn't make it onto Houzz.  Items are linked below each photo.  All images of by Elaine Musiwa for Houzz.

Soren Chair by Coil + Drift, Wall Hangings by Alyssa Eckert

Soren Chair by Coil + Drift, Wall Hangings by Alyssa Eckert

Dusk Coffee Table by Coil + Drift, tan Soren Chair by Coil + Drift

Dusk Coffee Table by Coil + Drift, tan Soren Chair by Coil + Drift

Atlas 90 Wall Lamp by Coil + Drift

Atlas 90 Wall Lamp by Coil + Drift

Dusk Coffee Table and Soren Chair by Coil + Drift, Vase Pillow by Amelie Mancini

Dusk Coffee Table and Soren Chair by Coil + Drift, Vase Pillow by Amelie Mancini

Brass Sugar Spoon by Coil + Drift, Ceramics by btw ceramics

Brass Sugar Spoon by Coil + Drift, Ceramics by btw ceramics

Soren Chair by Coil + Drift

Soren Chair by Coil + Drift

Painting by Francesca Brenda, Rex Sideboard (prototype) by Coil + Drift

Painting by Francesca Brenda, Rex Sideboard (prototype) by Coil + Drift

Hover Shelving Unit by Coil + Drift

Hover Shelving Unit by Coil + Drift

Brass Sugar Spoon by Coil + Drift, Ceramics by btw ceramics

Brass Sugar Spoon by Coil + Drift, Ceramics by btw ceramics

Coil + Drift Travelogue: Indonesia

After leaving Hong Kong, the first stop on my first trip to Southeast Asia, I headed to Indonesia, a complicated and beautiful nation of over 19,000 islands.  The first stop was Jakarta, the capital, and a notoriously stressful, traffic-clogged megapolis, and my goal was to try and find its design scene, if it had one, and hopefully some architectural and design beauty inside what I'd discover to be an extraordinary and terribly frustrating city.

One of the large roundabouts in Jakarta's center.

One of the large roundabouts in Jakarta's center.

The Intiland Tower, designed by Paul Rudolph in 1986, as seen from my taxi while sitting in grid-lock traffic.

The Intiland Tower, designed by Paul Rudolph in 1986, as seen from my taxi while sitting in grid-lock traffic.

Traffic in Jakarta at a standstill next to a construction site for the new train system that will go above and below ground and will be the first mass-transit available in Jakarta, besides some busses and a regional train.

Traffic in Jakarta at a standstill next to a construction site for the new train system that will go above and below ground and will be the first mass-transit available in Jakarta, besides some busses and a regional train.

Coffee at 115 Coffee in Jakarta

Coffee at 115 Coffee in Jakarta

IMG_2761.jpg
The entrance to Indoestri, a space offering classes and support to Jakarta's growing maker scene.

The entrance to Indoestri, a space offering classes and support to Jakarta's growing maker scene.

Plates, cake stands, and other wares by General Object, a Jakarta-based accessories studio.

Plates, cake stands, and other wares by General Object, a Jakarta-based accessories studio.

Indoestri

Indoestri

The town square in Old Batavia, the city built by the Dutch during their colonial rule, that is now a decaying neighborhood inside sprawling Jakarta.  Families like to come to hang out and take portraits on weekends.

The town square in Old Batavia, the city built by the Dutch during their colonial rule, that is now a decaying neighborhood inside sprawling Jakarta.  Families like to come to hang out and take portraits on weekends.

IMG_2769.jpg

After a week exploring Jakarta, which is on Indonesia's largest and most populated island, Java, we flew to Bali, only a few hour flight, but worlds away in its architectural appearance.  The people of Indonesia practice many religions, but the Balinese practice their own form of Hinduism that is only found on Bali and in Balinese communities elsewhere in the country.  Faced with extreme tourism, the Balinese hold strong to their religious and cultural beliefs and lead beautiful and fascinating lives.  Our first stop was the lively town of Seminyak, filled with shops and great beaches, but also with tourists.  We quickly rented moto-bikes so we could get around and out of town.  This proved to be the best decision of the trip and allowed us to find places we never would have seen in a car or on foot.  Our second stop was Ubud, a mountain village known as the cultural center of Bali.  There too we took our moto-bikes and found that outside the touristic town the real beauty of Bali was waiting to greet us.

Inside Delu Villas where we stayed in Seminyak, Bali

Inside Delu Villas where we stayed in Seminyak, Bali

IMG_2771.jpg
Chic cafés abound in Seminyak.

Chic cafés abound in Seminyak.

The open-air market next door to Delu Villa.

The open-air market next door to Delu Villa.

IMG_2774.jpg
One of the many temples we visited.

One of the many temples we visited.

IMG_2778.jpg
Tanah Lot is a temple located on rocks in the ocean and is one of the most spectacular temples in Bali.

Tanah Lot is a temple located on rocks in the ocean and is one of the most spectacular temples in Bali.

IMG_2783.jpg
Head 20 minutes outside of any town on your moto-bike and you'll find farm fields like these.  This one was planted with watermelons.

Head 20 minutes outside of any town on your moto-bike and you'll find farm fields like these.  This one was planted with watermelons.

This is a rice paddy.

This is a rice paddy.

While in Ubud we stayed at Bambu Hinda, an eco-resort made of bamboo structures and old Javanese bridal huts.  The entire resort has views of rice paddies and serves some of the best food in Bali.

While in Ubud we stayed at Bambu Hinda, an eco-resort made of bamboo structures and old Javanese bridal huts.  The entire resort has views of rice paddies and serves some of the best food in Bali.

The terrace on the bridal hut, where we stayed.

The terrace on the bridal hut, where we stayed.

IMG_2793.jpg
We also visited The Green Village, a community of houses made entirely of bamboo.

We also visited The Green Village, a community of houses made entirely of bamboo.

One of the many traditional Balinese dance performances offered in Ubud.  All are recommended.

One of the many traditional Balinese dance performances offered in Ubud.  All are recommended.

This is PT Bamboo, the factory that makes bamboo houses and furniture that ship all over the world.

This is PT Bamboo, the factory that makes bamboo houses and furniture that ship all over the world.

We visited The Green School, a school entirely off the grid, that creates the green leaders of the future.

We visited The Green School, a school entirely off the grid, that creates the green leaders of the future.

Another house in The Green Village

Another house in The Green Village

On the final day of our trip we came upon this shop in Ubud offering traditional antiques and wares from the island of Timor in the South of the country.  We had to buy an additional suitcase to bring our purchases home!

On the final day of our trip we came upon this shop in Ubud offering traditional antiques and wares from the island of Timor in the South of the country.  We had to buy an additional suitcase to bring our purchases home!

This temple has a natural spring inside it.  Around the outside are spouts that let the water, which is considered holy and very cleansing, flow into separate pools.  In these pools people line up submerged themselves under each spouts literally be glanced by the water and by the Gods.

This temple has a natural spring inside it.  Around the outside are spouts that let the water, which is considered holy and very cleansing, flow into separate pools.  In these pools people line up submerged themselves under each spouts literally be glanced by the water and by the Gods.

Blackbody CO-OP Extended

We are excited to announce that Blackbody CO-OP has been extended and our collection, along with beautiful works by other up-and-coming designers will be on view at the Blackbody Showroom at 25 Greene Street in Soho for six months.  Please stop by, have a look, and the let us know what you think!

NYCxDESIGN: Coil + Drift at Blackbody CO-OP

As part of NY Design Week Coil + Drift will be a part of the inaugural Blackbody Co-op, an exhibition of contemporary furniture and objects by a selection of on-the-rise designers amongst the latest designs by French lighting studio, Blackbody. Taking place in the immense two-story Blackbody showroom at 25 Greene Street in Soho, Blackbody Co-op will take place May 15 - 19 and will partner with the Soho Design District.

Coil + Drift will show items for their latest collection at Blackbody Co-op including the Rex Sideboard, a cherry-wood sideboard with deep-grain character and a mirrored wine-and-spirit compartment; the Dusk Coffee Table, a coffee table with a geometric, solid-brass base and white-marble top; and the Soren Chair, a minimal, ash-wood and leather dining/side chair with a bold, arc-shaped back rest, available in black and brown leather.

Based in France and founded in 2007, Blackbody develops and produces innovative OLED lighting solutions, based on a new lighting philosophy, which encourages creativity and emotion.  Thanks to its technological savoir-faire and the flexibility of its production capacity, Blackbody is the perfect partner for the conception and production of innovative OLED lighting, either on a tailor-made or large-scale level.  Blackbody CO-OP will feature work by Asher Israelow, Aspace, Coil + Drift, Further Designs, Hart Made, Matthew Bradshaw Studio, and Surname Goods among others.

Blackbody CO-OP
May 15 - 19
Blackbody NYC Showroom
25 Greene Street NY, NY 10013

Press Day:  Friday, May 15
Opening Party: Saturday, May 16  6-9pm

 

Coil + Drift Travelogue: Hong Kong

At the beginning of April I had the rare opportunity to hop on a plane and travel to Southeast Asia.  Being that I love an adventure, I leapt at the chance.  On the itinerary was Hong Kong, then Jakarta, Indonesia, and finally Seminyak and Ubud, on the island of Bali.  This being my first trip to Southeast Asia, I knew I needed to savor every moment so I made it my goal to learn as much as I could about the design scenes of each vastly different city.  This is the first of three travelogues that I will write about the one of the most extraordinary journeys of my life, one for each section of my trip beginning with Hong Kong.

Speak to anyone about visiting Hong Kong and the first thing they will tell you is there is no way to see everything in one trip.  This city of seven million people is extremely vibrant, full of culture and diversity, and a breeze to navigate thanks to Cantonese/English signage, incredible public transit, and (when all else fails) cheap taxis.  When I travel I like to make a rough plan at the beginning of each day and then allow it to fall apart as I get lost and discover unexpected places.  I knew that four days in Hong Kong would not be enough to do everything I wanted to so I allowed myself to let go of my expectations and to enjoy neighborhoods, shops, galleries, and cafés more than I might if I stuck to a strict schedule.  

The city that unfolded before my eyes when I stepped out the door of my hotel each day was vast and yet incredibly locally-minded.  A major metropolis that is both easy for a Westerner to understand and worlds away.

Hong Kong Island

Hong Kong Island

I stayed in the Central area on Hong Kong Island and set out my first morning to explore the Sheung Wan neighborhood, which I had been told housed many of the design showrooms in the city.  I loved this quiet and hilly neighborhood, which reminded me of San Fransisco mixed with a little bit of London.

Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

Bamboo scaffolding!

Bamboo scaffolding!

image.jpg
image.jpg

As is mandated by law, all of Hong Kong's buildings must use bamboo scaffolding while under construction, including sky-scrapers, which is both magical and terrifyingly beautiful.  

I found many shops selling furniture, new and antique, much of it imported from Europe, but one that I absolutely loved was Amelie & Tulips, which sells new pieces in the mid-century modern aesthetic mainly from The Netherlands.  Sheung Wan has many small alleyways and these are where I found my favorite spots.  I noticed Common Ground, a quiet coffee shop and café, after spotting a beautiful antique chair outside the shop as I peaked up a hilly carless alleyway.  The coffee was perfect and the owners welcoming and full of good conversation.  In a city with a vibrant coffee scene these guys stand out.

Common Ground

Common Ground

image.jpg
image.jpg

After I got my coffee fix I headed to the Gagosian Gallery's Hong Kong outpost as well as Pearl Lam Gallery (conveniently housed in the same building).  I wasn't blown away by the work they were showing but was glad to stop in.

Pearl Lam Gallery

Pearl Lam Gallery

Pearl Lam Galler

Pearl Lam Galler

That night we went out in search of some of that delicious food Hong Kong is known for.  We headed to Yardbird.  I had walked by it during the day and later read that it was one the hot new spots in town that many said wasn't to be missed.  As many new restaurants in any large city around the world, they don't take reservations, so we gave them our name and phone number and headed to find a bar in which to enjoy our two-hour wait.  Thankfully we found Mitte Bar, a grungy-chic Italian bar close by.  The drinks were perfect and in no time were back at Yardbird enjoying one of the best dinners I've had in months.  The Chinese/American-influenced Japanese fare is wacky and extraordinary and the sake list is vast and delightful.  Don't miss Yardbird.

The next day I headed to the water to get some perspective and grabbed an old-and-efficient Star Ferry to Kowloon across the harbor.  These ferries have been running forever and are a great way to discover Hong Kong's vast harbor.  I didn't have time to explore much of Kowloon, but the view of Hong Kong Island from the water front was beautiful and well-worth the $2.50 HKD cost and 10 minute ride.  

The Star Ferry in Hong Kong Harbor

The Star Ferry in Hong Kong Harbor

Kowloon waterfront

Kowloon waterfront

The Hong Kong Arts Centre on Kowloon

The Hong Kong Arts Centre on Kowloon

Back on Hong Kong Island I headed for Kennedy town, high up in the hills where the University of Hong Kong is located.

Hiking up to Kennedy Town

Hiking up to Kennedy Town

One of the many old buildings on the University of Hong Kong campus.

One of the many old buildings on the University of Hong Kong campus.

Heeding a tip from a friend I met the day before I headed to Ethos, a new concept café, shop, and gallery space in Kennedy Town that is intelligently curated and filled with creative items for the home and workplace.  I chatted with one of the owners about what it was like to open a multi-genre lifestyle shop in Hong Kong and he told me it was still very rare and risky but he felt it was the future of live retail, something I've heard from many people in cities from NYC to Paris and now to Hong Kong. 

Ethos

Ethos

Ethos

Ethos

After wandering the hills and getting myself thoroughly lost I happened upon Café Deadend.  Situated next to it's equally-delicious sister bakery, this spot serves fresh fare and the salad I ordered on the chef's recommendation, was brightly flavored and delicious.  I wanted to spend ours in the beautifully-designed space sipping my cappuccino.   

Café Deadend

Café Deadend

Our last day in Hong Kong we hopped on a boat and headed 30 minutes from Central to Lamma Island based on a recommendation from my friend Sonia Scarr of Scarr Co.  Sonia had told me that Lamma Island is part of Hong Kong, but is feels like it is worlds away.  This completely car-less island turned out to be a must-see for the views and natural landscape alone and exceeded our expectations in so many ways.  After jumping off the ferry we took a four-hour hike through jungles, tiny villages, over white-sand beaches, and finally back to the 'town' where the ferry dropped us for a lunch of the morning's catches by the local fisherman.  It was a stunning place I will never forget and it is something everyone should see to experience the extreme varieties and juxtapositions that make up Hong Kong. 

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

Bananas on Lamma Island!

Bananas on Lamma Island!

Lamma Island

Lamma Island

On our final morning we headed to the center of town to catch our plane.  Now, that may sound odd, but one of the most innovative moves Hong Kong has made is the Airport Express station in Central Hong Kong.  Located at the IFC, a massive downtown shopping center, the Airport Express is a train that takes you directly to the airport.  Not only is it fast, (20 minutes door to door) but upon arrival to the station you check your bags and you don't see them until you've flown and landed at your destination.  That means you can check your bags, do some shopping or grab lunch, and then take your train - luggage-free - to the airport and directly to your gate.  Why every city doesn't have this system is beyond me.  It was so easy and left me with memories of a Hong Kong as a city that is welcoming, complex, accessible, and full of life.  I can't wait to go back and discover even more.  

Airport Express station at IFC

Airport Express station at IFC

Airport Express

Airport Express

Hong Kong Airport

Hong Kong Airport

Have you been to Hong Kong?  Do you have must-sees that I missed.  Please leave a comment and add to the discovery.  Thanks!